Functional Accessibility Requirements

    5. Generic requirements

    5.1.2 General

    5.1.3 Non-visual access

    5.1.3.11 Private listening volume

    Where auditory output is provided as non-visual access to closed functionality and is delivered through a mechanism for private listening, ICT shall provide at least one non-visual mode of operation for controlling the volume.

    5.1.3.12 Speaker volume

    Where auditory output is provided as non-visual access to closed functionality and is delivered through speakers on ICT, a non-visual incremental volume control shall be provided with output amplification up to a level of at least 65 dBA (-29 dBPaA).

    5.1.3.13 Volume reset

    Where auditory output is provided as non-visual access to closed functionality, a function that resets the volume to be at a level of 65 dBA or less after every use, shall be provided, unless the ICT is dedicated to a single user.

    5.1.5 Visual output for auditory information

    Where pre-recorded auditory information is needed to enable the use of closed functions of ICT, the ICT shall provide visual information that is equivalent to the pre-recorded auditory output.

    5.1.6 Operation without keyboard interface

    5.2: Activation of accessibility features

    Where ICT has documented accessibility features, it shall be possible to activate those documented accessibility features that are required to meet a specific need without relying on a method that does not support that need.

    5.4: Preservation of accessibility information during conversion

    Where ICT converts information or communication it shall preserve all documented non-proprietary information that is provided for accessibility, to the extent that such information can be contained in or supported by the destination format.

    5.6.2 Visual status

    When ICT has a locking or toggle control and the control is non-visually presented to the user, the ICT shall provide at least one mode of operation where the status of the control can be visually determined when the control is presented.

    6. ICT with two way voice communication

    6.2.1 RTT provision

    6.2.1.1 RTT communication

    Where ICT supports two-way voice communication in a specified context of use, the ICT shall allow a user to communicate with another user by RTT.

    6.2.1.2 Concurrent voice and text

    Where the ICT, or set of ICT, provided to a user, supports two-way voice communication and enables a user to communicate with another user by RTT, it shall provide a mechanism to select a mode of operation allowing concurrent voice and text.

    6.2.2 Display of Real-time Text

    6.2.2.1 Visually distinguishable display

    Where ICT has RTT send and receive capabilities, displayed sent text shall be visually differentiated from and separated from received text.

    6.2.2.2 Programmatically determinable send and receive direction

    Where ICT has RTT send and receive capabilities, the send/receive direction of transmitted text shall be programmatically determinable, unless the RTT has closed functionality.

    6.2.3 Interoperability

    Where ICT with RTT functionality interoperates with other ICT with RTT functionality (as required by 6.2.1.1) they shall support at least one of the four RTT interoperability mechanisms described below:

    a) ICT interoperating over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), with other ICT that directly connects to the PSTN as described in Recommendation ITU-T V.18 [i.23] or any of its annexes for text telephony signals at the PSTN interface;

    b) ICT interoperating with other ICT using VOIP with Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) and using real-time text that conforms to RFC 4103 [i.13];

    c) ICT interoperating with other ICT using RTT that conforms with the IP Multimedia Sub-System (IMS) set of protocols specified in TS 126 114 [i.10], TS 122 173 [i.11] and TS 134 229 [i.12];

    d) ICT interoperating with other ICT using a relevant and applicable common specification for RTT exchange that is published and available. This common specification shall include a method for indicating loss or corruption of characters.

    6.2.4 Real-time text responsiveness

    Where ICT utilises RTT input, that RTT input shall be transmitted to the ICT network supporting RTT within 1 second of the input entry.

    6.4: Alternatives to voice-based services

    Where ICT provides real-time voice-based communication and also provides voice mail, auto-attendant, or interactive voice response facilities, the ICT should offer users a means to access the information and carry out the tasks provided by the ICT without the use of hearing or speech.

    6.5.2 Resolution

    Where ICT that provides two-way voice communication includes real time video functionality, the ICT:

    a) shall support at least QCIF resolution;

    b) should preferably support at least CIF resolution.

    6.5.3 Frame rate

    Where ICT that provides two-way voice communication includes real-time video functionality, the ICT:

    a) shall support a frame rate of at least 12 frames per second (FPS);

    b) should preferably support a frame rate of at least 20 frames per second (FPS) with or without sign language in the video stream.

    6.5.4 Synchronization between audio and video

    Where ICT that provides two-way voice communication includes real-time video functionality, the ICT should ensure a maximum time difference of 100 ms between the speech and video presented to the user.

    6.6: Alternatives to video-based services

    Where ICT provides real-time video-based communication and also provides answering machine, auto attendant or interactive response facilities, the ICT should offer users a means to access the information and carry out the tasks related to these facilities:

    a) for audible information, without the use of hearing;

    b) for spoken commands, without the use of speech;

    c) for visual information, without the use of vision.

    7. ICT with video capabilities

    7.1.1 Captioning playback

    Where ICT displays video with synchronized audio, it shall have a mode of operation to display the available captions. Where closed captions are provided as part of the content, the ICT shall allow the user to choose to display the captions.

    7.1.2 Captioning synchronisation

    Where ICT displays captions, the mechanism to display captions shall preserve synchronization between the audio and the corresponding captions.

    7.1.3 Preservation of captioning

    Where ICT transmits, converts or records video with synchronized audio, it shall preserve caption data such that it can be displayed in a manner consistent with clauses 7.1.1 and 7.1.2.

    Additional presentational aspects of the text such as screen position, text colours, text style and text fonts may convey meaning, based on regional conventions. Altering these presentational aspects could change the meaning and should be avoided wherever possible.

    8. Hardware

    8.1.1 Generic requirements

    8.2.1 Speech volume gain

    8.2.1.1 Speech volume range

    Where ICT hardware has speech output, it shall provide a means to adjust the speech output volume level over a range of at least 18 dB.

    8.2.1.2 Incremental volume control

    Where ICT hardware has speech output and its volume control is incremental, it shall provide at least one intermediate step of 12 dB gain above the lowest volume setting.

    8.2.2 Magnetic coupling

    8.2.2.1 Fixed-line devices

    Where ICT hardware is a fixed-line communication device with speech output and which is normally held to the ear and which carries the "T" symbol specified in ETS 300 381 [1], it shall provide a means of magnetic coupling which meets the requirements of ES 200 381-1 [2].

    8.2.2.2 Wireless communication devices

    Where ICT hardware is a wireless communication device with speech output which is normally held to the ear, it shall provide a means of magnetic coupling to hearing technologies which meets the requirements of ES 200 381-2 [3].

    8.3.2 Clear floor or ground space

    8.3.2.3 Approach

    8.3.3 Reach range for ICT

    8.3.3.1 Forward reach

    8.3.3.1.3 Obstructed reach

    8.3.3.2 Side reach

    8.3.3.2.3 Obstructed side reach

    8.4.2 Operation of mechanical parts

    9. Web

    9.2.1 Non-text content

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.1.1 Non-text content.

    WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.1.1 Non-text content

    All non-text content that is presented to the user has a text alternative that serves the equivalent purpose, except for the situations listed below:

    • Controls, Input: If non-text content is a control or accepts user input, then it has a name that describes its purpose. (Refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 4.1 for additional requirements for controls and content that accepts user input.)
    • Time-Based Media: If non-text content is time-based media, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content. (Refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1.2 for additional requirements for media.)
    • Test: If non-text content is a test or exercise that would be invalid if presented in text, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.
    • Sensory: If non-text content is primarily intended to create a specific sensory experience, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.
    • CAPTCHA: If the purpose of non-text content is to confirm that content is being accessed by a person rather than a computer, then text alternatives that identify and describe the purpose of the non-text content are provided, and alternative forms of CAPTCHA using output modes for different types of sensory perception are provided to accommodate different disabilities.
    • Decoration, Formatting, Invisible: If non-text content is pure decoration, is used only for visual formatting, or is not presented to users, then it is implemented in a way that it can be ignored by assistive technology.

    9.2.2 Audio-only and video-only (pre-recorded)

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.2.1 Audio-only and Video-only (Pre-recorded).

    WCAG 2.0 success criterion: Audio-only and video-only (pre-recorded)

    For pre-recorded audio-only and pre-recorded video-only media, the following are true, except when the audio or video is a media alternative for text and is clearly labelled as such:

    • Pre-recorded Audio-only: An alternative for time-based media is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded audio-only content.
    • Pre-recorded Video-only: Either an alternative for time-based media or an audio track is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded video-only content.

    9.2.3 Captions (pre-recorded)

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.2.2 Captions (Pre-recorded).

    WCAG 2.0 success criterion: Captions (pre-recorded)

    Captions are provided for all prerecorded audio content in synchronized media, except when the media is a media alternative for text and is clearly labeled as such.

    9.2.5 Captions (live)

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.2.4 Captions (Live).

    WCAG 2.0 success criterion: Captions (live)

    Captions are provided for all live audio content in synchronized media.

    9.2.9 Sensory characteristics

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.3.3 Sensory Characteristics.

    WCAG 2.0 success criterion: Sensory characteristics

    Instructions provided for understanding and operating content do not rely solely on sensory characteristics of components such as shape, size, visual location, orientation, or sound.

    NOTE: For requirements related to colour, refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1.4.

    9.2.11 Audio control

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.4.2 Audio Control.

    WCAG 2.0 success criterion: Audio control

    If any audio on a Web page plays automatically for more than 3 seconds, either a mechanism is available to pause or stop the audio, or a mechanism is available to control audio volume independently from the overall system volume level.

    NOTE: Since any content that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole page, all content on the Web page (whether or not it is used to meet other success criteria) shall meet this success criterion. See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference.

    9.2.17 Timing adjustable

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 2.2.1 Timing Adjustable.

    WCAG 2.0 success criterion: Timing Adjustable

    For each time limit that is set by the content, at least one of the following is true:

    • Turn off: The user is allowed to turn off the time limit before encountering it; or
    • Adjust: The user is allowed to adjust the time limit before encountering it over a wide range that is at least ten times the length of the default setting; or
    • Extend: The user is warned before time expires and given at least 20 seconds to extend the time limit with a simple action (for example, "press the space bar"), and the user is allowed to extend the time limit at least ten times; or
    • Real-time Exception: The time limit is a required part of a real-time event (for example, an auction), and no alternative to the time limit is possible; or
    • Essential Exception: The time limit is essential and extending it would invalidate the activity; or
    • 20 Hour Exception: The time limit is longer than 20 hours.

    NOTE: This success criterion helps ensure that users can complete tasks without unexpected changes in content or context that are a result of a time limit. This success criterion should be considered in conjunction with WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 3.2.1, which puts limits on changes of content or context as a result of user action.

    9.2.18 Pause, stop, hide

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide.

    WCAG 2.0 success criterion: Pause, Stop, Hide

    For moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating information, all of the following are true:

    • Moving, blinking, scrolling: For any moving, blinking or scrolling information that (1) starts automatically, (2) lasts more than five seconds, and (3) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it unless the movement, blinking, or scrolling is part of an activity where it is essential; and
    • Auto-updating: For any auto-updating information that (1) starts automatically and (2) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it or to control the frequency of the update unless the auto-updating is part of an activity where it is essential.

    NOTE 1: For requirements related to flickering or flashing content, refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 2.3.

    NOTE 2: This success criteria is applicable to all content (whether or not there is an alternate accessible version of the content) since any content that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole page (including a link to the alternate version).

    NOTE 3: Content that is updated periodically by software or that is streamed to the user agent is not required to preserve or present information that is generated or received between the initiation of the pause and resuming presentation, as this may not be technically possible, and in many situations could be misleading to do so.

    NOTE 4: An animation that occurs as part of a preload phase or similar situation can be considered essential if interaction cannot occur during that phase for all users and if not indicating progress could confuse users or cause them to think that content was frozen or broken.

    9.2.27 Language of page

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 3.1.1 Language of Page.

    WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion: Language of Page

    The default human language of each Web page can be programmatically determined.

    9.2.28 Language of parts

    Where ICT is a web page, it shall satisfy WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 3.1.2 Language of Parts.

    WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion: Language of Parts

    The human language of each passage or phrase in the content can be programmatically determined except for proper names, technical terms, words of indeterminate language, and words or phrases that have become part of the vernacular of the immediately surrounding text.

    10. Non-web documents

    10.2.1 Non-text content

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.1.

    Table 10.1: Document success criterion: Non-text content

    All non-text content that is presented to the user has a text alternative that serves the equivalent purpose, except for the situations listed below:

    • Controls, Input: If non-text content is a control or accepts user input, then it has a name that describes its purpose. (Refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 4.1 [4] for additional requirements for controls and content that accepts user input.)
    • Time-Based Media: If non-text content is time-based media, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content. (Refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1.2 [4] for additional requirements for media.)
    • Test: If non-text content is a test or exercise that would be invalid if presented in text, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.
    • Sensory: If non-text content is primarily intended to create a specific sensory experience, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.
    • CAPTCHA: If the purpose of non-text content is to confirm that content is being accessed by a person rather than a computer, then text alternatives that identify and describe the purpose of the non-text content are provided, and alternative forms of CAPTCHA using output modes for different types of sensory perception are provided to accommodate different disabilities.
    • Decoration, Formatting, Invisible: If non-text content is pure decoration, is used only for visual formatting, or is not presented to users, then it is implemented in a way that it can be ignored by assistive technology.

    NOTE 1: CAPTCHAs do not currently appear outside of the Web. However, if they do appear, this guidance is accurate.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.1.1 Non-text content with the words

    10.2.2 Audio-only and video-only (pre-recorded)

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.2.

    Table 10.2: Document success criterion: Audio-only and video-only (pre-recorded)

    For pre-recorded audio-only and pre-recorded video-only media, the following are true, except when the audio or video is a media alternative for text and is clearly labelled as such:

    • Pre-recorded Audio-only: An alternative for time-based media is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded audio-only content.
    • Pre-recorded Video-only: Either an alternative for time-based media or an audio track is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded video-only content.

    NOTE 1: The alternative can be provided directly in the document - or provided in an alternate version that meets the success criterion.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0

    10.2.3 Captions (pre-recorded)

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.3.

    Table 10.3: Document success criterion: Captions (pre-recorded)

    For pre-recorded audio-only and pre-recorded video-only media, the following are true, except when the audio or video is a media alternative for text and is clearly labelled as such:

    • Pre-recorded Audio-only: An alternative for time-based media is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded audio-only content.
    • Pre-recorded Video-only: Either an alternative for time-based media or an audio track is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded video-only content.

    NOTE 1: The alternative can be provided directly in the document - or provided in an alternate version that meets the success criterion.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.2.1 Audio-only and Video-only (Pre-recorded) with the addition of note 1 above.

    10.2.5 Captions (live)

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.5.

    Table 10.5: Document success criterion: Captions (live)

    Captions are provided for all live audio content in synchronized media.

    NOTE 1: The WCAG 2.0 definition of "captions" notes that "in some countries, captions are called subtitles". They are also sometimes referred to as "subtitles for the hearing impaired". Per the definition in WCAG 2.0, to meet this success criterion, whether called captions or subtitles, they would have to provide "synchronized visual and / or text alternative for both speech and non-speech audio information needed to understand the media content" where non-speech information includes "sound effects, music, laughter, speaker identification and location".

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.2.4 Captions (Live) with the addition of note 1 above.

    10.2.9 Sensory characteristics

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.9.

    Table 10.9: Document success criterion: Sensory characteristics

    Instructions provided for understanding and operating content do not rely solely on sensory characteristics of components such as shape, size, visual location, orientation, or sound.

    NOTE 1: For requirements related to colour, refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1.4 [4].

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.3.3 Sensory Characteristics with the words "WCAG 2.0" added before the word "Guideline" in note 1 above.

    10.2.11 Audio control

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.11.

    Table 10.11: Document success criterion: Audio control

    If any audio in a document plays automatically for more than 3 seconds, either a mechanism is available to pause or stop the audio, or a mechanism is available to control audio volume independently from the overall system volume level.

    NOTE 1: Since any part of a document that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole document, all content in the document (whether or not it is used to meet other success criteria) shall meet this success criterion.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.4.2 Audio Control replacing "on a Web page" with "in a document", "any content" with "any part of a document", "whole page" with "whole document", "on the Web page" with "in the document", removing "See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference" and adding note 1.

    10.2.17 Timing adjustable

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.17.

    Table 10.17: Document success criterion: Timing adjustable

    For each time limit that is set by the document, at least one of the following is true:

    • Turn off: The user is allowed to turn off the time limit before encountering it; or
    • Adjust: The user is allowed to adjust the time limit before encountering it over a wide range that is at least ten times the length of the default setting; or
    • Extend: The user is warned before time expires and given at least 20 seconds to extend the time limit with a simple action (for example, "press the space bar"), and the user is allowed to extend the time limit at least ten times; or
    • Real-time Exception: The time limit is a required part of a real-time event (for example, an auction), and no alternative to the time limit is possible; or
    • Essential Exception: The time limit is essential and extending it would invalidate the activity; or
    • 20 Hour Exception: The time limit is longer than 20 hours.

    NOTE 1: This success criterion helps ensure that users can complete tasks without unexpected changes in content or context that are a result of a time limit. This success criterion should be considered in conjunction with WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 3.2.1, which puts limits on changes of content or context as a result of user action.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 2.2.1 Timing Adjustable replacing "the content" with "documents" and with the words "WCAG 2.0" added before the word "Success Criterion" in note 1 above.

    10.2.18 Pause, stop, hide

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.18.

    Table 10.18: Document success criterion: Pause, stop, hide

    For moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating information, all of the following are true:

    • Moving, blinking, scrolling: For any moving, blinking or scrolling information that (1) starts automatically, (2) lasts more than five seconds, and (3) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it unless the movement, blinking, or scrolling is part of an activity where it is essential; and
    • Auto-updating: For any auto-updating information that (1) starts automatically and (2) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it or to control the frequency of the update unless the auto-updating is part of an activity where it is essential.

    NOTE 1: For requirements related to flickering or flashing content, refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 2.3.

    NOTE 2: This success criteria is applicable to all content in the document (whether or not there is an alternate accessible version of the document) since any part of a document that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole document (including a link to the alternate version).

    NOTE 3: Content that is updated periodically by software or that is streamed to the user agent is not required to preserve or present information that is generated or received between the initiation of the pause and resuming presentation, as this may not be technically possible, and in many situations could be misleading to do so.

    NOTE 4: An animation that occurs as part of a preload phase or similar situation can be considered essential if interaction cannot occur during that phase for all users and if not indicating progress could confuse users or cause them to think that content was frozen or broken.

    NOTE 5: This is to be applied to all content. Any content, whether informative or decorative, that is updated automatically, blinks, or moves may create an accessibility barrier.

    NOTE 6: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide replacing "page" and "Web page" with "document", removing "See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference" in note 2 of the success criterion, with the words "WCAG 2.0" added before the word "Guideline" in note 1 above and with note 2 above re-drafted to avoid the use of the word "must".

    10.2.27 Language of page

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.27.

    Table 10.27: Document success criterion: Language of page

    The default human language of each document can be programmatically determined.
    NOTE: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 3.1.1 Language of Page replacing "web page" with "document".

    10.2.28 Language of parts

    Where ICT is a non-web document, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 10.28.

    Table 10.28: Document success criterion: Language of parts

    The human language of each passage or phrase in the document can be programmatically determined except for proper names, technical terms, words of indeterminate language, and words or phrases that have become part of the vernacular of the immediately surrounding text.

    NOTE 1: There are some document technologies where there is no assistive technology supported method for marking the language for the different passages or phrases in the document, and it would not be possible to meet this success criterion with those technologies.

    NOTE 2: Inheritance is one common method. For example a document provides the language that it is using and it can be assumed that all of the text or user interface elements within that document will be using the same language unless it is indicated.

    NOTE 3: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 3.1.2 Language of Parts replacing "content" with "document" and with the addition of note 1.

    11. Software

    11.2.1 Non-Web software success criteria (excluding closed functionality)

    11.2.1.1 Non-text content (screen reading supported)

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface and that supports access to assistive technologies for screen reading, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.1.

    Table 11.1: Software success criterion: Non-text content

    All non-text content that is presented to the user has a text alternative that serves the equivalent purpose, except for the situations listed below:

    • Controls, Input: If non-text content is a control or accepts user input, then it has a name that describes its purpose. (Refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 4.1 [4] for additional requirements for controls and content that accepts user input.)
    • Time-Based Media: If non-text content is time-based media, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content. (Refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1.2 [4] for additional requirements for media.)
    • Test: If non-text content is a test or exercise that would be invalid if presented in text, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.
    • Sensory: If non-text content is primarily intended to create a specific sensory experience, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content.
    • CAPTCHA: If the purpose of non-text content is to confirm that content is being accessed by a person rather than a computer, then text alternatives that identify and describe the purpose of the non-text content are provided, and alternative forms of CAPTCHA using output modes for different types of sensory perception are provided to accommodate different disabilities.
    • Decoration, Formatting, Invisible: If non-text content is pure decoration, is used only for visual formatting, or is not presented to users, then it is implemented in a way that it can be ignored by assistive technology.
    NOTE 1: CAPTCHAs do not currently appear outside of the Web. However, if they do appear, this guidance is accurate.
    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.1.1 Non-text content with the words "WCAG 2.0" added before each occurrence of the word "guideline" and with the addition of note 1 above.

    11.2.1.2 Audio-only and video-only (pre-recorded)

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface and that supports access to assistive technologies for screen reading and where pre-recorded auditory information is not needed to enable the use of closed functions of ICT, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.2.

    Table 11.2: Software success criterion: Audio-only and video-only (pre-recorded)

    For pre-recorded audio-only and pre-recorded video-only media, the following are true, except when the audio or video is a media alternative for text and is clearly labelled as such:

    • Pre-recorded Audio-only: An alternative for time-based media is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded audio-only content.
    • Pre-recorded Video-only: Either an alternative for time-based media or an audio track is provided that presents equivalent information for pre-recorded video-only content.
    NOTE 1: The alternative can be provided directly in the software - or provided in an alternate version that meets the success criterion.
    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.2.1 Audio-only and Video-only (Pre-recorded) with the addition of note 1 above.

    11.2.1.3 Captions (pre-recorded)

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.3.

    Table 11.3: Software success criterion: Captions (pre-recorded)

    Captions are provided for all pre-recorded audio content in synchronized media, except when the media is a media alternative for text and is clearly labeled as such.

    NOTE 1: The WCAG 2.0 definition of "captions" notes that "in some countries, captions are called subtitles". They are also sometimes referred to as "subtitles for the hearing impaired". Per the definition in WCAG 2.0, to meet this success criterion, whether called captions or subtitles, they would have to provide "synchronized visual and / or text alternative for both speech and non-speech audio information needed to understand the media content" where non-speech information includes "sound effects, music, laughter, speaker identification and location".

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identic.

    11.2.1.5 Captions (live)

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.5.

    Table 11.5: Software success criterion: Captions (live)

    Captions are provided for all live audio content in synchronized media.

    NOTE 1: The WCAG 2.0 definition of "captions" notes that "in some countries, captions are called subtitles". They are also sometimes referred to as "subtitles for the hearing impaired". Per the definition in WCAG 2.0, to meet this success criterion, whether called captions or subtitles, they would have to provide "synchronized visual and / or text alternative for both speech and non-speech audio information needed to understand the media content" where non-speech information includes "sound effects, music, laughter, speaker identification and location".

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.2.4 Captions (Live) with the addition of note 1 above.

    11.2.1.9 Sensory characteristics

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.9.

    Table 11.9: Software success criterion: Software success criterion: Sensory characteristics

    Instructions provided for understanding and operating content do not rely solely on sensory characteristics of components such as shape, size, visual location, orientation, or sound.

    NOTE 1: For requirements related to colour, refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1.4 [4].

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.3.3 Sensory Characteristics with the words "WCAG 2.0" added before the word "Guideline" in note 1 above.

    11.2.1.11 Audio control

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.11.

    Table 11.11: Software success criterion: Document success criterion: Audio control

    If any audio in a software plays automatically for more than 3 seconds, either a mechanism is available to pause or stop the audio, or a mechanism is available to control audio volume independently from the overall system volume level.

    NOTE 1: Since any part of a software that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole software, all content in the software (whether or not it is used to meet other success criteria) shall meet this success criterion.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 1.4.2 Audio Control replacing "on a Web page" with "in a software", "any content" with "any part of a software", "whole page" with "whole software", "on the Web page" with "in the software", removing "See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference" and adding note 1.

    11.2.1.17 Timing adjustable

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.17.

    Table 11.17: Software success criterion: Document success criterion: Timing adjustable

    For each time limit that is set by the software, at least one of the following is true:

    • Turn off: The user is allowed to turn off the time limit before encountering it; or
    • Adjust: The user is allowed to adjust the time limit before encountering it over a wide range that is at least ten times the length of the default setting; or
    • Extend: The user is warned before time expires and given at least 20 seconds to extend the time limit with a simple action (for example, "press the space bar"), and the user is allowed to extend the time limit at least ten times; or
    • Real-time Exception: The time limit is a required part of a real-time event (for example, an auction), and no alternative to the time limit is possible; or
    • Essential Exception: The time limit is essential and extending it would invalidate the activity; or
    • 20 Hour Exception: The time limit is longer than 20 hours.

    NOTE 1: This success criterion helps ensure that users can complete tasks without unexpected changes in content or context that are a result of a time limit. This success criterion should be considered in conjunction with clause 11.2.1.29 (On focus), which puts limits on changes of content or context as a result of user action.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 2.2.1 Timing Adjustable replacing "the content" with "software" and with the words "WCAG 2.0" added before the word "Success Criterion" in note 1 above.

    11.2.1.18 Pause, stop, hide

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.18.

    Table 11.18: Software success criterion: Document success criterion: Pause, stop, hide

    For moving, blinking, scrolling, or auto-updating information, all of the following are true:

    • Moving, blinking, scrolling: For any moving, blinking or scrolling information that (1) starts automatically, (2) lasts more than five seconds, and (3) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it unless the movement, blinking, or scrolling is part of an activity where it is essential; and
    • Auto-updating: For any auto-updating information that (1) starts automatically and (2) is presented in parallel with other content, there is a mechanism for the user to pause, stop, or hide it or to control the frequency of the update unless the auto-updating is part of an activity where it is essential.

    NOTE 1: For requirements related to flickering or flashing content, refer to WCAG 2.0 Guideline 2.3.

    NOTE 2: This success criteria is applicable to all content in the software (whether or not there is an alternate accessible mode of operation of the software) since any part of a software that does not meet this success criterion can interfere with a user's ability to use the whole software (including a user interface element that enables the user to activate the alternate accessible mode of operation).

    NOTE 3: Content that is updated periodically by software or that is streamed to the user agent is not required to preserve or present information that is generated or received between the initiation of the pause and resuming presentation, as this may not be technically possible, and in many situations could be misleading to do so.

    NOTE 4: An animation that occurs as part of a preload phase or similar situation can be considered essential if interaction cannot occur during that phase for all users and if not indicating progress could confuse users or cause them to think that content was frozen or broken.

    NOTE 5: This is to be applied to all content. Any content, whether informative or decorative, that is updated automatically, blinks, or moves may create an accessibility barrier.

    NOTE 6: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide replacing "page" and "Web page" with "software", removing "See Conformance Requirement 5: Non-Interference" in note 2 of the success criterion, with the words "WCAG 2.0" added before the word "Guideline" in note 1 above, with note 2 above re-drafted to avoid the use of the word "must" and with the addition of note 5 above.

    11.2.1.27 Language of software

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface and that supports access to assistive technologies for screen reading, it shall satisfy the success criterion in Table 11.27.

    Table 11.27: Software success criterion: Language of software

    The default human language of software can be programmatically determined.

    NOTE 1: Where software platforms provide a "locale / language" setting, applications that use that setting and render their interface in that "locale / language" would comply with this success criterion. Applications that do not use the platform "locale / language" setting but instead use an accessibility-supported method for exposing the human language of the software would also comply with this success criterion. Applications implemented in technologies where assistive technologies cannot determine the human language and that do not support the platform "locale / language" setting may not be able to meet this success criterion in that locale / language.

    NOTE 2: This success criterion is identical to the WCAG 2.0 Success Criterion 3.1.1 Language of page, replacing "each web page" with "software" and with the addition of note 1 above.

    11.2.2 Non-Web software requirements (closed functionality)

    11.2.2.2 Audio-only and video-only (pre-recorded)

    11.2.2.2.1 Pre-recorded audio-only

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface which is closed to assistive technologies for screen reading and pre-recorded auditory information is needed to enable the use of closed functions of ICT, the functionality of software that provides a user interface shall meet requirement 5.1.5 (Visual output for auditory information).

    11.2.2.2.2 Pre-recorded video-only

    Where ICT is non-web software that provides a user interface which is closed to assistive technologies for screen reading, it shall meet requirement 5.1.3.7 (Speech output for video information).

    11.3.2 Accessibility services

    11.4.1 User control of accessibility features

    Where software is a platform it shall provide sufficient modes of operation for user control over those platform accessibility features documented as intended for users.

    11.4.2 No disruption of accessibility features

    Where software provides a user interface it shall not disrupt those documented accessibility features that are defined in platform documentation except when requested to do so by the user during the operation of the software.

    12. Documentation and support services

    12.1.1 Accessibility and compatibility features

    Product documentation provided with the ICT whether provided separately or integrated within the ICT shall list and explain how to use the accessibility and compatibility features of the ICT.

    12.2.2 Information on accessibility and compatibility features

    ICT support services shall provide information on the accessibility and compatibility features that are included in the product documentation.

    12.2.3 Effective communication

    ICT support services shall accommodate the communication needs of individuals with disabilities either directly or through a referral point.

    13. ICT providing relay or emergency service access

    13.1.2 Text relay services

    Where ICT is intended to provide a text relay service, the text relay service shall enable text users and speech users to interact by providing conversion between the two modes of communication.

    13.1.3 Sign relay services

    Where ICT is intended to provide a sign relay service, the sign relay service shall enable sign language users and speech users to interact by providing conversion between the two modes of communication.

    13.1.4 Lip-reading relay services

    Where ICT is intended to provide a lip-reading relay service, the lip-reading service shall enable lip-readers and voice telephone users to interact by providing conversion between the two modes of communication.

    13.1.5 Captioned telephony services

    Where ICT is intended to provide a captioned telephony service, the captioned telephony service shall assist a deaf or hard of hearing user in a spoken dialogue by providing text captions translating the incoming part of the conversation.

    13.2: Access to relay services

    Where ICT systems support two-way communication and a set of relay services for such communication is specified, access to those relay services shall not be prevented for outgoing and incoming calls.

    13.3: Access to emergency services

    Where ICT systems support two-way communication and a set of emergency services for such communication is specified, access to those emergency services shall not be prevented for outgoing and incoming calls.

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